OME Marathon Concert & Meet the Audience

CITME partner and local new music presenter, Oh My Ears (OME), will be hosting the 4th Annual Oh My Ears (OME) Marathon Concert this January 28th from 12:00 pm – 1o:00 pm.

This is no ordinary concert. OME is fantastic at integrating aspects of participatory culture as part of its concert ethic, including it’s unique Meet the Audience component, including an opportunity to submit audio recordings and sound samples that can be used to create music at the event itself. The OME Marathon will include 10 hours of new music performances and musically engaging experiences.

WHEN: Jan 28th, 2017, 12:00 pm-10:00pm

WHERE: Mesa Arts Center, Nesbitt-Elliott Playhouse
1 E Main St, Mesa, AZ 85201

TICKETS: $20 regular, $15 student (bring ID), Ages 15 and under FREE

Local raffle by Tuft and Needle


The 2017 OME Marathon Concert, featuring local and national ensembles, composers and performers, to be held at the Mesa Arts Center on January 28th, 2017. OME is thrilled to be bringing some of the most interesting and talented musicians from Phoenix and around the country to share with our hometown audiences. 2017 will be our most ambitious concert yet and will also feature engaging opportunities such as Musical Maps and Meet the Audience.


OME is a non-profit organization born out of a love for new music and a desire to create community connection through musically engaging experiences since the spring of 2014. Their annual OME Marathon concert has been called “nothing short of extraordinary,” and is a cornerstone event for the city’s burgeoning new music community


CONTACT INFO:
Check out the Oh My Ears website
Michael Ferraro and Elizabeth Kennedy Bayer admin@ohmyears.com

Elizabeth Kennedy Bayer, founder/co-director 979-236-7589


SOCIAL MEDIA:
Facebook event     

 Facebook page      

Twitter & Instagram: @ohmyearsmusic

Sound Explorations: Developing Connected Music Learning Playlists

The Sound Explorations project, led by the Consortium for Innovation and Transformation in Music Education at Arizona State University, is in the process of developing six connected music learning playlists organized around the following themes:

  • Building instruments and interfaces:
  • Coding and programming music
  • Connecting music and culture
  • Jamming: Solo and Groups
  • Making beats
  • Producing original music

Sound Explorations: Creating, Expressing, and Improving Communities, the full title of our project, gives a sense of the types of engagement we will encourage. Each playlist’s multiple pathways will guide youth along experiences addressing national Core Arts Standards artistic practices of creating, performing, responding, and connecting through interest-based musical practices. Learning experiences will emphasize creativity and self-expression,  encouraging youth to consider and act upon how music can improve people’s lives.

The goal of the playlist set is to provide rich musical contexts that connect formal (i.e. middle and high school music programs) non-formal (i.e. community or after-school music programs), and informal (i.e. homes or libraries) settings.

Playlists will foster musical inquiry and creativity, deepen musical skills and understandings, and strengthen participants’ sense of selves as musical people who make a difference in their communities and society.

So far we’ve identified several design challenges and opportunities that we are thinking through as we continue our work. Some examples include:

  1. How might we design and facilitate learning experiences with an ethic of inquiry and project-based learning in a playlist format?
  2. How might we support opportunities for rich, playful, and satisfying musical engagement through the learning experiences even if the learner has limited access to resources?
  3. What type of structures make the most sense for learners to navigate and engage with learning experiences (XPs) that are organized in varied ways that enable multiple pathways within the same playlist?

We are collaborating with partners such as NYU’s MusEdLab, Today’s Future Sound, and Rosie’s House: A Music Academy for Children, consultants with content expertise, pre-service and in-service music educators, teaching artists, community youth organizations, and youth to help us answer these and other questions that emerge.

I’ll provide an update to some of these issues in the next post.

In the meantime, feel fee to participate in the development of our music learning playlists through our crowdsourcing initiative with the following form (and share widely):

Community Music Engagement Course Collaboration

Dr. Roger Mantie’s Community Music Engagement course collaborated with Dr. Kevin Wilson’s Leisure and Quality of Life course to explore the possibilities of leisure, music, and community engagement through an innovative opportunity for student projects. Take a look at this write up on the initiative and the fabulous projects that emerged from this work and impacted the local community

Connected Learning at The Center

During Fall 2016 CITME will partner with the ASU Music Education Department, ASU School of Community Resources and Development, and Phoenix Center for the Arts to launch a number of music programs ranging from coached chamber groups to digital music creation labs.

Photo by sergio rossi
Photo by sergio rossi

Under the leadership of Dr. Roger Mantie, HIDA at the Center will support creative musical engagement, music teaching and learning, community engagement, and leisure to impact downtown Phoenix positively. 

This initiative is supported by a Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts Research Council grant.

CITME will help connect learning across school and community contexts and link pre-service music educators with the program through community leadership, service learning, and socially engaged practice initiatives. 

We look forward to launching this program this coming Fall! 

 

A Night in the Fields: Creating Live Music to Videogame Play

On July 20th 2013 The Consortium for Innovation and Transformation participated in A Night in the Fields, a project in collaboration with the Center for Games and Impact and Phoenix Art Museum.

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During A Night in the Fields, a group of musicians collaborated with attendees to create music that interacted with the way that people played the videogame Flower. As people played the game, musicians performed varied acoustic and electric instruments, laptops, and mobile devices to create and manipulate music that captured the sense of place and action occurring in the game.

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Attendees were invited to participate in the music creation and performance with a range of small acoustic instruments. Each game player, situated between the group of musicians and a large screen upon which the game Flower was projected, had a unique and customized immersive experience. Attendees also had their own unique experiences as they watched the gameplay and listened to the music.

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This project, in collaboration with the Center for Games and Impact, The Consortium for Innvotion and Transformation in Music Education, and The Phoenix Art Museum was a unique convergence of contemporary musical engagement, video games, interactive media, participatory culture, digital culture, music education, and community engagement.

The A Night in the Fields interactive music and video game event was an outgrowth of ongoing research and practice taking place in CITME and the ASU music education department looking at the process of creating music in relation to interactive media and connections to music teaching and learning. The musicians in the group made decisions collaboratively through a consensus-based process. A Night in the Fields was the group’s first public event and a significant point in the development of this ongoing project and research. For more information on the A Night in the Fields music and video game project and related initiatives contact: Evan Tobias evan.tobias@asu.edu

969923_600882586618900_607703065_nThe A Night in the Fields interactive music ensemble consisted of:

Evan Tobias – facilitation & iPad
Ryan Bledsoe – saxophone
Corrie Box – vocals & effects processing
Rebecca Carr – MIDI keyboard controller
Patrick Cooper – string bass
Bill Fitzgibbons – trumpet
Jennifer Horne – flute
Jared O’Leary – percussion
Julian Peterson – laptop, gamepad controller, effects processing, & live audio mixing
Skye Van Duuren – trumpet

A Night in the Fields Saturday July 20 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m @ Phoenix Art Museum Great Hall

A Night in the Fields was a part of the Center for Games and Impact’s and Phoenix Art Museum’s Celebrating the Art of Making and Playing Games: Bridging Digital and Live Play Experiences event July 20 from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Additional Information on related projects and organizations:

Phoenix Art Museum Announcement of A Night in the Fields

The Art of Video Games Exhibit @ the Phoenix Art Museum

The Center for Games and Impact

Celebrating the Art of Making and Playing Games: Bridging Digital and Live Play Experiences (The Center for Games & Impact @ the Phoenix Art Museum July 20 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

The Consortium for Innovation and Transformation in Music Education (CITME @ASU):

ASU School of Music Music Education Department

The Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts

 

AZ Beat Lab in the Community

CITME partner and ASU Music Education Masters student Samuel Pena has been hard at work developing the AZ Beat Lab. Over the past school year Samuel and the AZ Beat Lab have provided programming to the Music Instrument Museum, Mesa SparkFest, and Art Detour at Palabras Libreria. The Beat Lab facilitates beat making with technology such as launchpads, laptops, iPads, and even the Makey Makey! Samuel applies pedagogy, curriculum design, program development, and community engagement developed over several ASU Music Education courses and initiatives with his rich experience with community music making and facilitation to engage people in musical experiences and learning. 

12377830_1139607932750931_2878497084077990270_oCITME is proud to partner with AZ Beat Lab and looks forward to the organization growing over time and future collaborations in schools, after-school programs, and community events.

 

Sun Devil Stadium Reinvention Through Music

As part of our ongoing efforts to explore the role of music in community engagement and socially engaged practice, CITME supported the Sun Devil Stadium 365 Reinvention #SDS365 initiative this November. Music education students facilitated participatory music making in the entrance to Sun Devil Stadium.

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We invited the public to jam with us using acoustic and electric percussion equipment along with interactive media and musical interfaces such as a controller developed with a Makey Makey.

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We invited event attendees to create and perform music with an Akai APC 40 by triggering samples of sounds from across the ASU Tempe campus as imagery from campus was projected on a stadium wall in an interactive audio- visual installation designed by students.

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In addition to taking part in the event, students developed their skills in facilitating participatory music events with people in school or community contexts.

Find out more about the #SDS365 event and see a very short clip of students performing in the video below:

 

Songs of the Heart: School University Partnership

Throughout 2014, a team of music education students including undergraduates Tyler Cano and Nicole Sanchez and doctoral students Isaac Bickmore and Jesse Rathgeber facilitated a songwriting project with students at Mountain Sky Junior High in partnership with ASU Gammage. In connection with the musical Once, Mountain Sky students created seven original songs that addressed the theme of Songs of the Heart

Mountain Sky students performed their original songs for the public by the entrance of Gammage prior to the performance of Once. Our team helped scaffold Mountain Sky students’ learning and engagement throughout the process and celebrated their development as musicians and songwriters. 

ASU students involved in the project applied and developed their skills at facilitating creative music making and fostering artistic inquiry. The team shared their experience and perspectives on the potential of such partnerships and the power of reflection in teacher practice at the 2015 Mountain Lake Colloquium for Teacher of General Music in the presentation Reflecting In Action: Preservice Teacher and Graduate Student Reflections on a Middle School Songwriting Project.

This project would not have been possible without the support of ASU Gammage, teachers and administration of Mountain Sky Junior High, and ASU music education department. 

 

Tutorials for Developing Music Performing and Creating Systems with Lemur

Sander DeVries, a masters student in music education at Arizona State, engaged in a project where he learned how to use the iPad app Lemur to design music performing and creating systems by programming graphical user interfaces. Sander developed related projects involving creating and performing music in Garageband with Lemur that he pilot tested with middle school students.

Here are some of Sander’s video tutorials with connections to music teaching and learning:

Using the iPhone/iPad app Lemur to wirelessly control Ableton on a computer

 

Scripting and Expressions in the Lemur Editor

 

Creating a simple keyboard interface in the Lemur Editor